Press Release

For Immediate Release                                                                                      1 April 2016

McGill Faculty & Librarians for Divestment

The Real Costs of McGill’s Investment in Fossil-fuels: Lost Donations, Lost Credibility

Montreal, QC— 1 April 2016McGill Faculty & Librarians for Divestment expresses its grave concern over recent developments following the McGill Board of Governors decision to approve the recommendation of its Committee to Advise on Matters of Social Responsibility (CAMSR) to deny a student-led petition to divest the University’s endowment from the fossil-fuel industry. In its report, CAMSR found that the fossil-fuel industry does not cause grave social injury in its impact on the environment and recommended that McGill retain its investments in this industry.

At an event held today on campus at McGill, it was announced that a planned $2 million gift to the university has been withdrawn by an anonymous donor in protest over the Board’s decision to continue its investments in the fossil-fuel industry. Naghmeh Sabet, the Portfolio Manager with Scotia Wealth Management who was handling the planned gift on behalf of the donor and who spoke at the event, cited “the social injury caused by investing in fossil fuels” and the Board’s failure to adhere to “the socially responsible investing approach one would expect from those managing endowment funds” as reasons for the withdrawal of the gift.

“McGill’s leadership is demonstrating startlingly poor management skills,” said Dror Etzion, a professor in the Desautels Faculty of Management at McGill. “They are alienating alumni, who are key sources of revenue; they are oblivious to evolving financial conditions; they are ignoring internal stakeholders such as students and faculty; they are not managing risk at all.  It is a textbook case of flailing leadership, and even our first-year students would easily discern these blunders.”

“Two million dollars is not pocket change,” observed Shaun Lovejoy, Professor of Physics. “Losses like this are a direct result of the Board’s decision to invest in the fossil-fuel industry, and they undermine the credibility of our teaching and research at McGill.”

The announcement came at a ceremony in which 20 McGill alumni returned their McGill degrees in protest over the Board’s approval of the CAMSR report and the university’s ongoing investment it the fossil fuel industry.

“This is a solemn occasion,” said Professor Darin Barney, Grierson Chair in Communication Studies. “I have worked my entire professional life to help students earn their degrees. To see them returned breaks my heart. This should be a wake-up call for the Board of Governors, a sign of the distance between its decision and the convictions of the community it represents.”

 “I look forward to the day that these degrees will be restored to those who earned them, when McGill divests from fossil-fuels,” said Professor Greg Mikkelson of McGill’s Department of Philosophy and School of Environment.  “Evidence and logic did not carry the day within the boardroom last week. What will it take for them to realize they made the wrong decision by remaining invested in global warming? Students occupying administrative offices, alumni giving back their degrees, donors withdrawing million-dollar gifts? –It is time for the people charged with governing this institution to stop being part of the problem, and to become part of the solution.”

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McGill faculty members available for additional comment:

Prof. Shaun Lovejoy (English and French)

Department of Physics

McGill University

lovejoy@physics.mcgill.ca

514-621-6240

Prof Greg Mikkelson

Dept. of Philosophy and McGill School of Environment

McGill University

gregory.mikkleson@mcgill.ca

514-849-9485

Prof. Darin Barney (English)

Dept. of Art History & Communication Studies

McGill University

514-974-5945

darin.barney@mcgill.ca

Additional resources:

Report of the Committee to Advise on Matters of Social Responsibility https://www.mcgill.ca/boardofgovernors/files/boardofgovernors/gd15-44_camsr_report.pdf

McGill Faculty for Divestment letter http://www.mcgillfacultyfordivestment.com/

Divest McGill http://divestmcgill.com/about/our-campaign/

 McGill Faculty & Librarians for Divestment

“Our Future – Our Choice” – Fossil-Fuel Divestment and Peaceful Protest at McGill

In the wake of the Board of Governors decision to deny Divest McGill’s petition calling for divestment of the University’s endowment from the fossil-fuel industry, members of the organization have elected to engage in peaceful protest action to press their case.

Under the banner of “Our Future – Our Choice,” these dedicated students have deposited themselves in the foyer to the Principal’s office, and in Community Square, so that they might be heard. They make three demands:

  • That the University hold public hearings on the discredited report of the Committee to Advise on Matter of Social Responsibility (CAMSR).
  • That CAMSR publicly discloses all expert testimony gathered in the course of its consideration of the petition.
  • That Principal Fortier makes a statement acknowledging what the CAMSR Report shockingly did not: the activities of fossil fuel corporations cause grave social harm, through the exacerbation of climate change and the devastating impacts on frontline communities.

In short, they are asking for informed public discussion (of the sort that should have preceded the Board’s decision), they are asking for transparency, and they are asking for reason. The question we should ask ourselves as supporters of Divest McGill is: is this too much to ask?

McGill Faculty & Librarians for Divestment continues to support Divest McGill in its efforts to achieve the outcome of divestment, including its recent peaceful protest actions. We also appreciate that many of those who signed our original letter endorsing the divestment petition might feel differently, and so we would like to set out the reasons for our ongoing support of these students.

What justifies resort to peaceful protest as a political tactic? Typically, justification for such action combines a sense of overriding imperative concerning the end that protestors hope to achieve and clear indication that this end could not be achieved through established mechanisms of institutional representation and decision-making. These conditions cannot simply be asserted by those undertaking protest; they must be demonstrated, such that reasonable people would agree that protest is the only remaining option.

These are demonstrably the conditions under which Divest McGill has resorted to protest.

Few reasonable people would dispute the fact that global-warming is a pressing crisis, or that the fossil-fuel industry exacerbates it and its attendant harms through ongoing, unlimited extractive activity. Yet, CAMSR has found that the fossil–fuel industry is not the source of significant social injury in the form of gravely-injurious impacts on the environment. To quote

the Report: “the most pronounced and harmful effects of climate change have not yet been experienced, and may not happen” (Section V). This is the logic that has guided the Board in its decision to continue investing in this industry, and thereby to continue investing in global warming and the harm it causes, harm of an unprecedented magnitude. It also contributes to a political climate in which activity that should be unacceptable – unlimited fossil-fuel extraction – is tolerated as a viable way of doing business. It is for these reasons that divestment from the fossil-fuel industry is demonstrably imperative.

It is also clear that the students of Divest McGill have been patient and conscientious in following the institutional process set out for determining the ethical status of the University’s investments. They have submitted petitions to the appropriate governing bodies. Their second petition, falling squarely within the terms of reference of the Committee to Advise on Matters of Social Responsibility, was accompanied by a 150-page, evidence-based, meticulously argued brief. They have met with the committee to respectfully answer questions and clarify positions whenever summoned. They have engaged in a comprehensive effort to educate and inform the campus on this matter. They have gathered the formal endorsement of thousands of individual McGill students, multiple student representative bodies, hundreds of faculty and staff members and dozens of McGill alumni. Divest McGill has made countless presentations as part of the global movement for climate justice. In 2015, they were awarded a Catalyst Award by the McGill Office of Sustainability. They have played by the rules.

What do they have to show for it?

The Board of Governors is the first and only body at McGill to vote against the petition on divestment.1 After years of delay, Board members received the confidential CAMSR report one day before the vote was to take place. Requests to release a preliminary report to allow for response from the petitioners and open consultation with the campus community were rejected. The names of parties consulted in private by CAMSR in preparing its report were not disclosed. Divest McGill was not permitted to respond to the testimony of these experts. Nor was any open, public consultation held with the campus community and its various stakeholders. The Board’s discussion and vote on the CAMSR recommendation took place in closed session. It bears noting that the Principal and the Chair of the Board of Governors are also members of CAMSR, which raises questions about the Board’s ability to consider the Committee’s report objectively. The students who submitted the divestment petition and accompanying 150-page research brief were not informed of the presentation of the CAMSR report or the Board vote – they learned of it only when the agenda for the unannounced Board meeting was posted online a few hours before the meeting.

1 Resolutions supporting the divestment petition have been passed by the Faculty of Law, the Faculty of Arts, McGill School of Environment, the McGill Office of Religious and Spiritual Life, the Department of Integrated Studies in Education, the Students’ Society of McGill University, the Post-Graduate Students’ Society, the MacDonald Campus Students’ Society, the Arts Undergraduate Society and the Association of McGill University Support Employees.

Divest McGill’s decision to resort to peaceful protest should be considered in this light. The legitimacy of even peaceful protest can be questioned when the end it seeks is self-interested or trivial, when those undertaking it have not bothered to follow established processes, and when it is clear that such processes provide a fair and reasonable chance of success. None of this pertains in the case of Divest McGill. The end they seek is imperative, and demonstrably in the public interest. They have followed established procedures to the letter. Yet, the process they undertook in such good faith has unfolded as if none of their efforts mattered at all.

It is truly unfortunate that Divest McGill’s years-long struggle for climate justice at the University has come to this point. Protesting a negative decision is the last thing the students of Divest McGill wanted. What they wanted was for the University they love to live up to its own principles, to match their courage, and to exert moral leadership on this most grave and universal of concerns. They were sorely disappointed. Now, they are acting as they feel they must, in the only way that has been left to them. We should be with them.

30 March 2016

Press Release

McGill Faculty & Librarians for Divestment

 

For Immediate Release – 24 March 2016

McGill Board of Governors Maintains Investment in Global Warming

Montreal, QC— 24 March 2016McGill Faculty & Librarians for Divestment condemns the decision yesterday by the Board of Governors of McGill University to continue the University’s investment in global warming. The decision came as the Board approved the recommendation of its Committee to Advise on Matters of Social Responsibility (CAMSR) to deny a student-led petition to divest the University’s endowment from the fossil-fuel industry. In its report, CAMSR found that the fossil-fuel industry does not cause social injury in the form of grave injurious impact on the environment. The CAMSR report asserts that “grave injurious impact is a threshold which arguably has not been reached and can yet be avoided” (Section V).

“Does the Board really expect the McGill community to stomach the idea that killing 150,000 people per year, as global warming already does, fails to constitute grave injurious impact?” asked Professor Greg Mikkelson of McGill’s Department of Philosophy and School of Environment.  “Do these people really expect us to accept the idea that the massive biodiversity loss already caused by global warming and ocean acidification does not constitute grave injurious impact?”

The Board of Governors decision took place on short notice in a meeting closed to the public. Board members received the confidential report one day before the vote was to take place. The students who submitted the divestment petition and accompanying 150-page research brief were not informed of the presentation of the CAMSR report or the Board vote. Requests to release a preliminary report to allow for response from the petitioners and open consultation with the campus community were rejected. The names of parties consulted by CAMSR in preparing its report were not disclosed. The Board discussion and vote on the CAMSR recommendation were closed to the campus community.

“It seems the Board of Governors wanted to rush through this approval with as little consultation and scrutiny as possible, and that all its talk about appreciating and respecting the students’ efforts was empty rhetoric,” said Professor Darin Barney, Grierson Chair in Communication Studies at McGill. “This is the sort of thing that leads people to lose faith in the integrity of the institution and its governance.”

The Board of Governors is the first and only body at McGill to vote against the petition on divestment. Resolutions supporting the divestment petition have been adopted by the Faculty of Law, the Faculty of Arts, McGill School of Environment, the McGill Office of Religious and Spiritual Life, the Department of Integrated Studies in Education, the Students’ Society of McGill University, the Post-Graduate Students’ Society, the MacDonald Campus Students’ Society, the Arts Undergraduate Society and the Association of McGill University Support Employees. Thousands have signed letters and petitions in support of divestment.

McGill Faculty & Librarians for Divestment is particularly concerned with the poor quality of evidence and argumentation presented in the CAMSR Report. For example, in an effort to relieve fossil-fuel companies of their responsibility for global warming and justify McGill’s investment in those firms, the Report attributes the negative impact of carbon emissions to “the end-use consumption of fossil fuels” (Section V). “This is like blaming smokers for the carcinogenic properties of cigarettes,” said Prof. Shaun Lovejoy, of the Department of Physics. “By that logic, McGill would never have divested from tobacco companies, which it did in 2007.”

 “With this decision, based on reasoning in a Report that does not withstand scrutiny, the Board of Governors claims to deliberate on behalf of the McGill community despite a chorus of academic expression to the contrary,” says Prof. Richard Janda, of the Faculty of Law. “I am saddened and disappointed by the failure by the Board to take a position of intellectual and moral leadership on the most important scientific and social issue of our time.”

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McGill faculty members available for additional comment:

Prof. Shaun Lovejoy (English and French)

Department of Physics

McGill University

lovejoy@physics.mcgill.ca

514-621-6240

 

Prof Greg Mikkelson

Dept. of Philosophy and McGill School of Environment

McGill University

gregory.mikkelson@mcgill.ca

514-849-9485

 

Prof. Darin Barney (English)

Dept. of Art History & Communication Studies

McGill University

514-974-5945

darin.barney@mcgill.ca

 

Additional resources:

Report of the Committee to Advise on Matters of Social Responsibility https://www.mcgill.ca/boardofgovernors/files/boardofgovernors/gd15-44_camsr_report.pdf

McGill Faculty for Divestment letter http://www.mcgillfacultyfordivestment.com/

Divest McGill http://divestmcgill.com/about/our-campaign/

McGill Faculty Members Call For Divestment from Fossil Fuels

For Immediate Release 

9 February 2015

McGill Faculty Members Call For Divestment from Fossil Fuels

Professors Greg Mikkelson and Shaun Lovejoy holding the open letter to the McGill Board of Governors.

Professors Greg Mikkelson and Shaun Lovejoy holding the open letter to the McGill Board of Governors.

Montreal, QC— 9 February 2015 — Today, McGill Faculty for Divestment submitted a letter to the McGill University Board of Governors, calling on the Board to divest McGill’s endowment fund from the top 200 fossil fuel companies by estimated carbon reserves, with an immediate focus on companies heavily involved in the Canadian oil sands.

“Reducing dependency on fossil fuels is an urgent matter,” said McGill medical anthropologist Dr. Margaret Lock, a signatory to the letter, Officer of the Order of Canada and Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada. “Divestment by leading institutions such as McGill will send a strong message to industry that the status quo is not acceptable, and makes clear that development of alternative sources of energy is imperative.”

The letter is signed by over 100 McGill faculty members, and has been submitted in support of a petition by the student-led group Divest McGill, asking the Board’s Committee to Advise on Matters of Social Responsibility to make a finding of social injury arising from the University’s investments in the fossil fuel industry. Started in the Fall of 2012, the petition now has over 1500 signatures from students, staff, faculty & alumni, and endorsements from all 3 major student associations.

“With the Divest McGill campaign, McGill’s students are asking the University to take a leadership position in the transition to more sustainable energy practices,” said Darin Barney, Canada Research Chair in Technology & Citizenship at McGill, and a signatory to the faculty letter. “It is important for the Board to know that the entire McGill Community supports the campaign for fossil-fuel divestment, including faculty members from across the campus.”

McGill Faculty for Divestment joins similar campaigns by faculty at universities worldwide, including Stanford University in the United States, and Concordia University and the University of British Columbia in Canada.

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McGill faculty members available for additional comment:

Prof. Shaun Lovejoy (English and French)

Department of Physics, McGill University

514-398-6537

lovejoy@physics.mcgill.ca

Prof. Christopher Barrington-Leigh (English and French)

School of Environment and the Institute for Health and Social Policy, McGill University

438-238-4659

chris.barrington-leigh@mcgill.ca

Prof. Darin Barney (English)

Dept. of Art History & Communication Studies, McGill University

514-398-5683

darin.barney@mcgill.ca

 

Additional resources:

McGill Faculty for Divestment letter http://www.mcgillfacultyfordivestment.com/ 

Divest McGill http://divestmcgill.com/about/our-campaign/

Fossil Free Stanford http://www.fossilfreestanford.org/press-release-jan-11-2015.html 

Divest UBC http://www.ubcc350.org/faculty_divestment

Professors Greg Mikkelson and Shaun Lovejoy holding the open letter to the McGill Board of Governors.

Professors Greg Mikkelson and Shaun Lovejoy holding the open letter to the McGill Board of Governors.